Marc Brandenburg @ 032c, November 3rd 2011

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Marc Brandenburg by Paul Feigelfeld 

MARC BRANDENBURG is a multimedia artist who was born in 1965 in Berlin, where he currently resides and works. Brandenburg is known for his graphite-on-paper drawings that adopt the look of photographic negatives. Interested in scenes of power and excess, his drawings, made from original and found photographs, depict crowds at soccer games and political protests, as well as celebrities and consumer objects appropriated from mass media.

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“I’m interested in people who embody something very contemporary and progressive, and yet seem removed from the current time. With their own style, their own stance, their own world vision, they simply can’t be characterized. Reinhard Wilhelmi, Michael Jackson and Yves Saint Laurent are all examples. Yves’ legendary nude portrait, taken to his own specifications by Jeanloup Sieff, was an absolutely modern and confident picture that embodied the homosexual man. Michael Jackson blew up race, gender and age boundaries. He was the most radical entertainer of the 20th century. Through his extreme wealth, he transformed himself into an art figure with undefined racial and gender identity. In addition, he fathered three white children. I don’t believe there is a middle-class African American family in North America that would be awarded white children for adoption. This kind of tragic corruption reveals just how far we are from a truly free society. For Michael Jackson to have these children was a flamboyant demonstration of political power.”

For 032c Workshop’s exhibition vitrine, Brandenburg has created a unique phosphorescent, film-like montage installation of his works. The idea to incorporate black light to his drawings and prints is the result of a chance visit to the famed Berlin bar, “Kumpelnest 3000″. Distortion and disorientation enforce a concentration on some of the essential aspects of an image. By hand drawing photographic negatives, Brandenburg intimately disentangles the mediating forces that manifest popular images.


Source: http://032c.com/workshop/marc-brandenburg/

‘Vandals #2 and #3’ from Julika Gittner @ DAZ (Deutsches Architektur Zentrum), October 28th 2011

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Vandals #2 and #3 are part of a series of temporary public sculptures by the London artist and architect Julika Gittner. Chained to lampposts, the objects are exposed to an urban condition over a period of 10 days. Whilst the sculptures act as provocateurs as well as receptacles of aggression and vandalism they are also vulnerable pieces of artwork. Outside of the protective space of the museum their fragile constructions become sensors for how the public treats culture beyond the grip of the bourgeois white gloves. The process of exposing the objects on the street is documented in photographs. The sculptures were presented at DAZ.

Text source: http://www.daz.de/sixcms/detail.php?object_id=&area_id=37&id=4114533&template_id=76

‘About painting’ @ ABC (Art Berlin Contemporary) fair, September 7th-11th 2011

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Art Berlin Contemporary runs under the motto: About Painting. But it’s not strictly painting. We could also find sculpture, drawing, video etc. Some of them are more “painterly” than others.

Twenty years ago, few exhibitions focused on painting specifically as the enduring influence of conceptual art tended to focus attention on issues of framing, rather than pictures. The legacy of these conceptual practices still looms large in contemporary art practices, including much recent painting, which is characterized by an intense reflection of the medium and its history. The combination of critical and at the same time confi-dent use of paint is a defining feature of a wide variety of current artistic practices that deal with pictures either on the wall, or in space.

The concept of the „painterly,” as delineated by Heinrich Mifflin as a specific art historical category over one hun-dred years ago, forms another source of interest in recent painting: “painting is the triumph of appearance over the real”, stated Mifflin („…der Triumph des Schein iiber das Sein”) While this might sound like an endorsement of es-capist decor, Mifflin’s motto does not promote deceptive forms of realism or allegory. Instead, the statement speaks positively to the unique ways in which painting traffics with ambiguity.

Alongside contemporary paintings and works ‘about pain-ting’ from different countries and generations, abc will feature influential individual historical positions that build part of the subject’s contextual background: painting as possibility, not as ideology.

The participating artists were selected under the curatorial guidance of Rita Kersting, (former director of the Kunstver-ein fiir die Rheinlande und Westfalen), who, together with Marc Glode (film theorist and the curator of abc 2010) de-signed the exhibition’s spatial setting and presentation.

abc art berlin contemporary was founded four years ago as a new independent, hybrid exhibition format, between Cu rated show and gallery event. The initiators, a group of Berlin galleries, have succeeded in establishing the exhi-bition as an important date in the international art calen-dar.

Source: http://www.artberlincontemporary.com/de/2011/about.html

Starting the blog: ‘After Barbara Kruger’ @ Meine Haus, Winter 2011

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To start, this is my tribute to Barbara Kruger, the American collage artist famous for her layered photographs and the artist used also in the header of this blog.

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This artist exposes theories about the sociocultural life in her country specifically, and analyzes the role of the media.

From Foucault, Kruger extracts that a person’s identity is constructed by social forces, ie one individual social relation with respect to the other. Also, thanks to Barthes, she realized that the “power” is exercised through language.

The mix of text and photography, are symbols of negative and positive conceptions in the messages posted.